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Tendon repair surgery can sideline you for many months

Tendon repair surgery is often required in the event of a severed or damaged tendon. While it’s not the only treatment option, your medical team may suggest that it’s the best way to make a full recovery.

While tendon repair surgery can typically be completed on an outpatient basis, that doesn’t mean it’s a minor procedure. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • It can take up to three months to heal: Your surgeon may suggest that you don’t use the repaired tendon for up to 12 weeks, as you must give it time to make a full recovery. Pushing yourself too hard too soon can result in additional damage.
  • A cast or splint may be necessary: Immobilizing the tendon takes tension off the repaired area, giving it time to heal.
  • Physical therapy may be suggested: This is often the best way to improve the likelihood of regaining a full range of motion. It can also help strengthen your tendon post-surgery.

When tendon repair surgery is combined with the appropriate follow-up care, such as resting the injury and partaking in physical therapy, the outlook is very good.

However, there are times when long-term complications may occur, such as in the event of excess scar tissue build-up.

If you sever or injure a tendon at work, such as the result of an equipment-related accident, work with your medical team to implement a treatment strategy for improving your odds of making a full recovery. Once you have a plan in place, consider if you’re in a position to receive workers’ compensation benefits until you fully recover.

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